Sessions Overview

Co-Conveners:

Description:

Co-Conveners:

BROWN, Larry (Cornell University, USA),DONG Shuwen (SinoProbe, China),SHEEHAN Anne (University of Colorado, USA), ZHU Rixiang (Institute of Geology and Geophysics, CAS, China), ASSUMPCAO Marcelo (University of São Paulo,Brazil), EBINGER Cindy(Tulane University, USA), THYBO Hans (ILP), PETROV Oleg (VESEGI), KRAWCZYK Charlotte (GFZ), DURRHEIM Raymond John (University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa),KASHUBIN, Sergey (Russian Geological Research Institute [VSEGEI])
Quo Vadis (trans. “Where are we going?”)

Description:

This session welcomes researchers from all over the world to share their research achievements in the field of deep lithospheric studies using such techniques as deep seismic reflection and refraction profiling, broadband seismic observations, and magnetotelluric sounding (MT). Informed by such studies of existing results, we also seek to stimulate future lithospheric research by a discussion of critical tectonic zones that have not yet been probed by modern deep exploration techniques. We hope that this discussion will facilitate new initiatives such as the global deep exploration cooperation (Earth CT) program.

Co-Conveners:

SHI Yaolin(University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China), KLEMPERER Simon (Stanford University, USA), YIN An (State University of California at Los Angeles, USA), NIU Fenglin (Rice University, USA), YUAN Xiaohui (GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences, Germany)

Description:

The Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau are the most spectacular manifestations of continent-continent collisional orogens and forms one of the most prominent geologic features on the Earth’s surface. This session will highlight recent SinoProbe and other studies of Tibet and welcomes all studies of continental collision zones around the world. We seek diverse geologic, geochemical, geophysical and modeling studies that help us to better understand lithospheric structure and dynamics.

Co-Conveners:

MILSHTEIN, Evgenia (Russian Geological Research Institute [VSEGEI]), TAPPONNIER Paul (National Institute of Natural Hazards, China),CARBONELL Ramon (CSIC-Inst. Earth Sciences, Spain), MOONEY, Walter D. (U.S. Geological Survey, USA), XIAO Wenjiao (Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, CAS, China), LIU Lijun (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Description:

Eurasia is the largest and most geologically diverse land mass on Earth. More than five decades of exploration has probed the deep structure of this region, including a variety of geologic, geochemical and geophysical methods, with numerous active and passive seismic studies as well as non-seismic methods. This session welcomes contributions that report new insights into the deep structure of Eurasia and it margins. Results that are multi-disciplinary and that combine multiple data sets are welcomed.

Co-Conveners:

GERYA Taras(ETH, Zurich), ZHANG Junfeng (University of Geosciences, Wuhan, China), CHEN Ling (Institute of Geology and Geophysics, CAS, China), WANG Qin (Nanjing University, China)

Description:

This interdisciplinary session invites contributions from various disciplines in geophysics, geodynamics, structural geology and geochemistry that focus on the structure and evolution of the continental lithosphere and on geodynamic processes within the continental interior. The session will present overviews of current knowledge on the structure of the crust and the upper mantle in different tectonic settings, ranging from Precambrian cratons to sedimentary basins, continental rift zones, and intracontinental collisional orogens. Geodynamic studies will demonstrate the role of various processes in intracontinental deformation, ranging from collisional, extensional and strike-slip deformation by plate tectonics, to intracontinental deformation caused by lithosphere-mantle dynamic interaction associated with hotspots, large igneous provinces and large-scale impacts.

Co-Conveners:

ARTEMIEVA Irina(Stanford University, USA), Lü Qingtian( SinoProbe Center, China), ERNST Richard (Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada),HOU Zengqian (National Science Foundation of China, Institute of Geology of CAGS, China),DENTITH Michael (University of Western Australia, Australia),LI Yaoguo(Colorado School of Mines, USA)

Description:

The geological processes in the lithosphere are closely related to deposition of minerals, many of which occur only in specific lithospheric settings. We invite contributions from geology, geophysics, geodynamics, geochemistry and petrology with focus on the links between the crustal structure, lithosphere evolution, plate tectonics, deep mantle processes, including LIPs, and the origin of various mineral deposits in different geodynamic and tectonic settings. Multidisciplinary contributions with focus on Precambrian cratons, continental collisional belts, modern and paleo-subduction systems, and large igneous provinces are particularly welcome.

Co-Conveners:

XU Yigang (Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS, China), YANG Jingsui(Nanjing University, China), Esteban GAZEL(Cornell University, USA), ZHENG Jianping (China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, China), CHEN Lihui(Northwest University, Xi' an, China), GRIFFIN William (Macquarie University, Australia)

Description:

Melting of the mantle transports the materials from the deep to the earth’s surface and builds the crust. Conversely, crustal material returns to the mantle through subduction, subduction erosion and/or delamination. Such a cycling process plays a key role on the habitability of our planet. The recycling of the crustal materials, including volatiles, not only affect the net growth of the crust, but also modifies the composition and the physical property of the mantle. In recent decades, the crustal growth, the crustal recycling process and the fate of the recycled crust have been investigated not only through petrological/geochemical observations of natural rocks, e.g. oceanic/continental basalts, mantle xenoliths/xenocrysts, ophiolitic mantle rocks, ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks, ultra-deep diamonds and their inclusions, but also through high-pressure experiments and geodynamic modelling. Recent progresses on above topics are welcome in this session.

Co-Conveners:

HOU Zengqian (National Science Foundation of China, Institute of Geology of CAGS, China), WANG Tao (Institute of Geology, CAGS, China), O' REILLY Suzanne Y. (Macquarie University, GEMOC ARC National Key Centre, Australia), SELTMANN, Reimar (The Natural History Museum, UK), XIAO Wenjiao (Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, CAS, China),GLADKOCHUB Dmitry (Institute of the Earth's Crust, Siberian Branch, RAS, Irkutsk, Russia), VAN STAAL Cees (Geological Survey of Canada), SAFONOVA Inna (Novosibirsk State University, Russia)

Description:

One of the important tasks of solid-Earth science is to investigate deep crustal and whole lithosphere architecture, pathways and processes that create large-scale mineralization. Lithospheric (magmas and rock) probes  and isotopic mapping (such as whole-rock Nd, zircon Hf) provide powerful datasets that can be used to interpret abundant geophysical data for these deep regions and to define their thermochemical structure that can inform energy- and mineral-exploration strategies. This session is focused on: (1) Continental growth and three-dimensional deep crustal architecture from regional- to orogenic-scales; (2) Ore systems, their timing and location as related to lithospheric architecture and tectonic environment; (3) Crustal expressions of lithosphere-scale ore systems within different orogenic types; (4) Integration of geochemical and geophysical datasets, and the role of geodynamic modelling in the prediction of the location metallogenic provinces. The key aims of this session are: (1) to evaluate current methods to delineate three-dimensional architecture for the deep crust and lithospheric mantle; (2) to investigate the relationship between lithosphere thermochemical structure and metallogenesis; and (3) to promote the integration of petrology, geochemistry, tectonics, geodynamic modelling and geophysical datasets in constructing a predictive model for metallogenesis through time. Case studies on regional crustal and underlying mantle architecture and regional metallogenesis are also welcome.

Co-Conveners:

WANG Chengshan (China University of Geosciences, Beijing, China),HARMS, Ulrich (ICDP, Germany), WIERSBERG Thomas (ICDP, Germany), DONG Hailiang (China University of Geosciences, Beijing, China)

Description:

Deep Scientific Drilling is the key method to acquire in-situ data and to retrieve uncompromised samples to complement surface studies and verify modeling results. In the last decade, a rapid progress in the development, installation and operation of borehole instrumentation on land and offshore has been achieved e.g. in Turkey (GONAF), South Africa (DSEIS), Iceland (SUSTAIN) and in the Kumano basin offshore Japan (NanTroSEIZE) and new borehole monitoring is being planned at various key locations around the world, e.g. in Italy (STAR), China (MW-DUL), in the Czech Republic (EGER), and in India (Koyna). The instruments allow to record crustal deformation over a large bandwidth of signal frequencies including seismic waves and slow deformation, but also tilt, temperature, fluid pressure and fluid composition, as well as microbial activities associated with geodynamic processes. Key technical developments include the application of fibre optic cables to record seismic data and temperature changes along sizable borehole sections over long periods and the deployment of ultrahigh temperature resistant instrumentation for obtaining data from the near-field of un-solidified magmatic bodiesor from magma itself. This session aims to provide an overview about state-of-the-art in the field of scientific drilling with a focus on borehole monitoring. In addition, contributions on site surveys, drilling, coring and logging techniques, borehole testing and experiments, modeling, and science are welcome.

Co-Conveners:

WU Zhongliang (Institute of Earthquake Forecasting, CEA, China), JIM Mori (Kyoto University, Japan), LI Li (Institute of Geophysics, CEA, China), PARAMESH Banerjee (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore), LI Ying (Institute of Earthquake Forecasting, CEA, China), Johannes SCHWEITZER (NORSAR, Norway)

Description:

Earthquake science plays an essential role in the study of geohazards. Earthquakes are the result of physical and chemical processes in the Earth’s interior under stress. To better understand this relation new research must go beyond the present knowledge of earthquake science. This Session focuses on, but is not limited to, the application of ‘DEEP Science’ to earthquake science, including fault friction and instability within the environment of the crust, fluid physics under crustal conditions, regular versus low-frequency (slow) earthquakes, comparative studies with implication for ‘DEEP Science’, rheology of Earth materials in the deep underground of the Earth and influence of different stress sources (local, regional, global tectonic) in the crust on observed seismicity. Other relevant geohazards, e.g., volcanoes, are welcome to be discussed in the session.

Co-Conveners:

LIU Jing (Tianjin University, China), KLINGER Yann (IPGP, France), LI Haibin (Institute of Geology, CAGS, China),BRAUN Jean(GFZ, Germany), HUNTINGTON Kate (University of Washington, USA)

Description:

Interactions between geological and surface processes and deep earth dynamics are increasingly recognized at various scales over the past decades. This ongoing research has profound implications for predicting natural hazards, interpreting sedimentary archives, and modeling global geochemical cycles. Earth surface processes operate at the intersection of tectonics, climate, and biology, making them inherently multifaceted and complex to study. Recent advances in geochronology/thermochronology, numerical methods, and remote sensing continue to improve our ability to measure landscape dynamics and explore the complicated interplay between various earth systems across an increasing range of spatial and temporal scales. The improvement of these techniques or used in noval combination facilitates interrogating geologic processes that differ across landscapes and timescales. In this session, we welcome studies that combine analytical techniques and new approaches to investigate diverse terrestrial processes (e.g. mountain building, erosion, landscape development, weathering, soil development, ecosystem shifts) across disparate spatial or temporal domains, and attempt to explore the potential linkage with deep earth dynamics.

Co-Conveners:

YAO Huajian,ZHANG Haijiang (University of Science and Technology of China), TIAN Xiaobo (Institute of Geology and Geophysics, CAS, China)

Description:

Dense arrays have been widely used in seismological studies and have greatly facilitated our understanding of seismic source properties and Earth’s structures of various length scales. More recently, in addition to broadband seismograph arrays, integrated geophone arrays with built-in battery and digitizer have been frequently used in high-resolution imaging of regional crust structures, volcanic regions, fault zones, urban areas, oil and gas as well as mineral deposit fields, etc. These integrated geophones or short-period seismometers are much cheaper and easier to deploy compared to broadband sensors, making dense arrays within tens or hundreds of meters receiver spacing feasible for high-resolution imaging of shallow structures and high-precision earthquake locations. In addition, recent developments in Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) have make ultra-dense-array imaging and source location applicable even using existing telecommunication fiber cables. In this session, we invite contributions from all relevant studies using dense arrays composed of broadband seismometers, integrated geophones, or DAS. We are particularly interested in new techniques related to data processing, imaging, full waveform inversion, and source location(including induced and triggered earthquakes) based on dense arrays. Dense array applications with passive and active sources including ambient noise sources are all encouraged for submission.

Co-Conveners:

JIN Sheng(China University of Geosciences, Beijing, China), SCHULTZ Adam (Oregon State University, USA),YE Gaofeng(China University of Geosciences, Beijing, China)

Description:

We call for contributions on all aspects of Electromagnetic (EM) methods that probes the deep electrical properties to advance our understanding of the tectonics and geodynamics of the lithosphere and asthenosphere. We seek presentations from the field observations to the physical/numerical modelling that images the solid Earth on both the regional and the global scales. Development of laboratory measurements of rock/mineral resistivity, new instrumentation, and new methodologies are also welcomed. Multi-disciplinary studies that combines the EM and other geophysical methods are particularly encouraged.

Co-Conveners:

HOU Zengqian (National Science Foundation of China, Institute of Geology of CAGS, China), DONG Shuwen (SinoProbe, Nanjing University, China), LÜ Qingtian (SinoProbe, China)

Description:

China Ministry of Nature Resources (Abbreviation in MNR) Laboratory of Deep Earth Science and Technology (formerly the SinoProbe Center) - is a new government-funded national fundamental research unit. It will serve as a platform of deep earth scientific prospective research; the development center for core technology and key equipment for deep earth exploration; a support platform for the detection of deep energy, and key mineral and underground space; the innovation base for deep earth observation experiments; the platform for sharing big data and the observing facilities for deep earth experiments; a new platform for international and intranational cooperation and talent development. It will be the operational unit of the China Deep Earth Exploration Program, which is one of the national major scientific programs extending to 2030.

The China MNR Laboratory of Deep Earth Science and Technology relies on the Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences. It is directly administrated by the Ministry of Natural Resources. It will use a flat management structure and flexible mechanism. It not only re-organizes new research branches, it integrates multiple existing institutions through different formats. The center will be constructed to facilitate joint experiments and tasks across the departments, and to pursue the maximum use of existing talent, material and financial resources by taking great advantages of different units, departments and nations. It will be a win-win sharing platform for all the earth scientists and institutions at worldwide.

At this session, Chinese Units will announce the new policies and positions to researchers worldwide with the goal of recruiting researchers, innovators, motivators and leaders to participate in the Deep Earth System Science (DESS). DESS includes Exploration of Deep Earth Structure, 4D Observation of Crustal Activity, Probing on Deep Material Composition and Distribution, Deep Material Cycles and Energy Conversion, Dynamic Behavior between Deep Earth Spherical Interfaces, Geodynamic Simulation, Data Processing and Imaging, Deep Exploration of Ore Deposits and Its 3D Transparent, Super Deep Scientific Drilling, Exploration of Deep Gas and Oil, Geothermal Detection and Utilization, Development of Technology and Equipment (especially in geophysics), Deep Earth Science Big Data Management and Mining, and more. Please share your scientific experience, achievements, planning and visions of your field. We will provide diverse positions, hiring models, flexible work approaches and research funds to the geoscientists who studied in geology, geophysics, natural resources, engineering geology & geophysics, and big data at present, whatever you are in the early career or have the world reputation senior scientists. We will provide different integrating research & benefit packages according the individual situation based on the bilateral satisfied agreement through personal negotiation.

This Session would be a Close-Door Meeting. Only the Units Announcements and Explanation will go on the public both on the web and virtual meeting.